Traveling to Amsterdam during Covid-19: What you need to know before you go

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Editor’s Note – Coronavirus cases are in flux around the world. Health officials warn that staying home until you are fully vaccinated is the best way to prevent transmission. Below is information on what to know if you still plan to travel, last updated on July 28.

(CNN) — If you’re planning a trip to Amsterdam, here’s what you need to know and expect if you’re visiting during the Covid-19 pandemic.

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Amsterdam is emerging from its third lockdown since the start of the pandemic, with almost all restrictions lifted across the Netherlands.

The Dutch government first introduced a strict nationwide lockdown in December 2020 following a rapid rise in Covid-19 cases. A few weeks later, the Netherlands introduced its first night curfew since World War II, leading to riots in Amsterdam and other major cities.

The most recent strict lockdown in the country began in December 2021 due to another spike in coronavirus infections. However, Amsterdam, along with the rest of the country, is now looking to return to normal life once again.

What’s on offer

Amsterdam is a top attraction due to its historic canals, stunning architecture, famous museums and huge cultural attractions. The Dutch city’s cycling culture has also contributed to its popularity, and the city is one of the most desirable destinations in Europe.

who can go

Residents of the European Union are allowed to enter Amsterdam along with the rest of the Netherlands for any reason.

Until March 23, travelers within the EU/Schengen area, EU citizens from outside the EU, or those who remain A country participating in the EU travel rules scheme Proof of vaccination, proof of recovery or negative test need not be presented prior to entry.

While people coming from outside these areas fall under the EU travel ban, there is an exemption for people coming from “safe” countries as well as those who receive full vaccinations, or can provide evidence of recent recovery from Covid-19.

From 22 April, travelers from EU and Schengen area countries traveling to the Netherlands by plane do not need a health declaration form.

Visitors from non-EU/Schengen countries are no longer required to have a negative Covid-19 test on arrival, provided they are fully vaccinated.

Currently, the following destinations outside the EU are listed as “safe”: Bahrain, Chile, Colombia, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Kuwait, New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Taiwan, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay.

People from outside the EU/Schengen who do not meet any exemptions and do not come from one of the destinations listed above are currently not permitted to enter the Netherlands.

All visitors are advised to “self-examine” upon arrival in the Netherlands and on the fifth day, Official Government Website.

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What are the restrictions?

Travelers within the EU/Schengen area, or People from destinations participating in the EU travel regulations scheme are no longer required to present proof of vaccination, proof of recovery or a negative test before entering the Netherlands.

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People from outside these areas fall under the EU travel ban, but there is an exemption for visitors from “safe” countries and those who are fully vaccinated, or can provide evidence of recent recovery from Covid-19.

Those from non-EU/Schengen countries who have been fully vaccinated do not need to have a negative Covid-19 test on arrival.

Bahrain, Chile, Colombia, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Kuwait, New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Taiwan, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay are currently considered “safe”.

The Netherlands government advises all arrivals to complete a “self-examination” upon entering the country, as well as on the fifth day of their visit.

What is the status of covid?

Last summer there was an increase in Covid cases in the Netherlands, albeit from a low base, driven in part by the emergence of the highly infectious delta variant.

Cases had been trending downward, but began to rise again at the end of the year and continued to rise into early 2022.

As of July 28, the country has reported more than 8.3 million cases, with more than 43,000 reported in the past week. There have been 23,032 deaths due to Covid. So far, more than 70% of the population has been fully vaccinated.

What can visitors expect?

Amsterdam is reopening as restrictions within the Netherlands continue to ease.

Bars, cafes, restaurants and non-essential stores have reopened and people no longer have restrictions on the number of guests in their homes at one time.

The city’s museums, including the Van Gogh Museum and the Rijksmuseum, reopened in late January, while nightclubs began welcoming visitors again on 25 February.

Most public places, including restaurants, museums, cinemas, gyms and large nightclubs, no longer require customers to produce a coronavirus entry pass before entering.

Masks are no longer required on public transport, indoor public places or airports.

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After spending a year staring at the same four walls, you’ll love the proud Dutch tradition of allowing visitors to peek into their homes, with locals leaving their blinds and curtains wide open. Open after dark.
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